Associate in Science in Physical Education

Division of Social Sciences — Curriculum Code: 0899

Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in Physical Education?

The Physical Education degree program curriculum parallels the first two years of a bachelor’s degree program at a four-year college or university. It will also serves as preparation for careers such as the following: teacher of health and physical education, recreation director, private fitness center administrator, and personal trainer/coach.

If I major in Physical Education, can I transfer to an upper-division college or university?

Yes. ECC awards the associate’s degree upon successful completion of all program requirements, then you can complete the next two years at an upper-level institution to obtain a bachelor’s degree in the discipline.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in reading, English, and/or mathematics before taking the core curriculum courses in your major.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you register for an average of 16 credits each semester, you can complete the degree in two years. You may shorten the amount of time required by taking courses in the summer sessions.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3250.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Demonstrate a wide variety of physical skills and techniques of activities;
  • Demonstrate first aid skills and techniques needed in emergency situations;
  • Develop personal, positive philosophies of healthy living and physical education that are consistent with expected professional standards and are based on reflective thinking about their learning;
  • Identify and discuss several career options available to a degreed physical educator; and
  • Communicate effectively with accurate ‘fitness and health’ terminology in written and/oral form.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills and Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (12 credits)
Choose one mathematics course and a lab science sequence or two mathematics courses and one lab science course from the following:

Mathematics: MTH 100, MTH 101, MTH 103, MTH 113, MTH 119, MTH 120, MTH 121, MTH 122, MTH 127, MTH 221, or MTH 222 (one or two 4-credit courses)
AND
Lab Science: BIO 101 – BIO 102, BIO 103 – BIO 104, BIO 121 – BIO 122; CHM 101 – CHM 102, CHM 103 – CHM 104; PHY 101 – PHY 102, PHY 103 – PHY 104, or PHY 113 – PHY 114 (one or two 4-credit courses)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
Choose two of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; ECO 101, ECO 102; POL 101, POL 104; PSY 101, PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (two 3-credit courses)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
AND
Choose one of the following art or music courses: ART 100, ART 101, ART 102; MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (17 - 18 credits)

HLT 101 Healthful Living (3 credits)
PHE 101 Introduction to Physical Education (2 credits)
PHE 115 First Aid and Safety (2 credits)
PHE 119 Concepts in Physical Education (2 credits)
Choose any one additional (non-repeated) Physical Education (PHE) course elective (one 1- or 2-credit course)
Choose any seven Physical Education (PHE) activity course electives (PHE courses) (seven 1-credit courses)

ADDITIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (12 credits)

BUS 101 Business Organization and Management (3 credits)

Social Science elective – choose any additional (non-repeated) course designated ANT, CJI, EDU, POL, PSY, REL, or SOC (one 3-credit course)

Literature elective – choose any additional (non-repeated) 200-level ENG course (one 3-credit course)

History elective – choose the HST course needed to complete the history sequence (one 3-credit course)

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

Total Credits Required for Degree: 62 – 63

First Semester
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
PHE 101 Introduction to Physical Education (2 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning mathematics or lab science requirement (4 credits)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (3 credits)
Physical Education (PHE) activity course elective (1 credit)
Physical Education (PHE) activity course elective (1 credit)
Physical Education (PHE) activity course elective (1 credit)

Second Semester
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning mathematics or lab science requirement (4 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning mathematics or lab science requirement (4 credits)
PHE 119 Concepts in Physical Education (2 credits)
Physical Education (PHE) activity course elective (1 credit)
Physical Education (PHE) activity course elective (1 credit)
Physical Education (PHE) activity course elective (1 credit)

Summer Session
Society & Human Behavior requirement (3 credits)
Humanistic Perspective art or music requirement (3 credits)

Third Semester
HLT 101 Healthful Living (3 credits)
Social Science elective (3 credits)
Humanistic Perspective literature requirement (3 credits)
Historical Perspective requirement (3 credits)
Physical Education (PHE) activity course elective (1 credit)

Fourth Semester
PHE 115 First Aid & Safety (2 credits)
BUS 101 Business Organization and Management (3 credits)
Physical Education (PHE) course elective (1 – 2 credits)
Literature elective (3 credits)
History elective (to complete the history sequence) (3 credits)


 
NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.

Associate in Science in Paralegal Studies

Division of Social Sciences — Curriculum Code: 2015

Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in Paralegal Studies?

The Paralegal Studies degree program is designed to prepare students to work in entry-level positions in a variety of legal settings such as law firms, corporations, government and other entities. A Paralegal typically performs a wide variety of tasks including, but not limited to, interviewing clients, investigating cases, preparing legal documents, performing legal research, writing legal memoranda, and assisting in trials and appeals. In addition to introducing students to the fundamental legal principles, this program develops students’ practical skills to prepare them to work effectively in any legal environment.

If I major in Paralegal Studies, can I transfer to an upper-division college or university?

Yes. The associate’s degree in Paralegal Studies prepares you to transfer to four-year colleges and universities to complete your bachelor’s degree. ECC’s transfer/articulation agreements with area four-year institutions insure a smooth transfer for our A.S. Paralegal Studies graduates.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in reading, English, and/or mathematics before taking the core curriculum courses in your major.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you register for an average of 17 credits each semester, you can complete the degree in two years. You may shorten the amount of time required by taking courses in the summer sessions.

May I transfer college-level courses into the Paralegal Studies program?

Students may transfer college-level courses as per College Regulation 5:18: Transfer Credit and Evaluations (Section #5). If Enrollment Services Express is unable to evaluate a course for transferability, the student must provide a course description and/or course outline. The Social Sciences Division Chairperson (or the Paralegal Studies Program Coordinator) will determine if the course is comparable to an ECC offering and if credit may be awarded.

Only students transferring from ABA-approved institutions may transfer up to a maximum of 15 credits toward the Paralegal Studies program requirements. The Program Coordinator will evaluate legal specialty courses from ABA-approved institutions on a case-by-case basis. In addition, students who wish to apply credits to the Paralegal Studies Program must also have their course and credits evaluated by the Program Coordinator within six (6) months of entry into Essex County College. This time limitation is necessary for purposes of advisement and to avoid possible course duplication.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3250.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Explain the role of a paralegal in today’s legal system;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the American legal system, fundamental legal principles, and the litigation process;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of legal ethics and of the Model Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility and Guidelines for Enforcement of the National Federation of Paralegal Associations, Inc.;
  • Proficiently access, locate, and research the law by both traditional and electronic methods;
  • Demonstrate problem-solving and critical, analytical thinking skills within the context of evaluating legal issues; and
  • Communicate effectively with accurate legal terminology in written and/or oral form, with a demonstrated proficiency in the use of technology.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills and Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (12 credits)
Choose one mathematics course and a lab science sequence or two mathematics courses and one lab science course from the following:

Mathematics: MTH 100, MTH 101, MTH 103, MTH 113, MTH 119, MTH 120, MTH 121, MTH 122, MTH 127, MTH 221, or MTH 222 (one or two 4-credit courses)

Lab Science: BIO 101 – BIO 102, BIO 103 – BIO 104, BIO 121 – BIO 122; CHM 101 – CHM 102, CHM 103 – CHM 104; PHY 101 – PHY 102, PHY 103 – PHY 104, or PHY 113 – PHY 114 (one or two 4-credit courses)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
POL 104 (3 credits)
AND
Choose one of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; ECO 101, ECO 102; POL 101; PSY 101, PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (one 3-credit course)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
AND
Choose one of the following art or music courses: ART 100, ART 101, ART 102; MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111*, HST 112*, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

Note: HST 111 and HST 112 are recommended.

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (24 credits)

PLS 101 Introduction to Law for Paralegals (3 credits)
PLS 102 Legal Research and Writing (3 credits)
PLS 105 Torts (3 credits)
PLS 107 Contracts (3 credits)
PLS 202 Advanced Legal Research and Writing (3 credits)
PLS 204 Business Organization and Government Regulation (3 credits)
PLS 205 Administrative Law (3 credits)
PLS 206 Litigation Procedures (3 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (6 to 9 credits)

ENG 105 (3 credits)

Choose two of the following Legal course electives: PLS 203 Wills and Estate Administration, PLS 210 Property Transactions, PLS 220 Family Law, and/or PLS 225 Law Office Management and Field Experience (two 3-credit courses)

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

Total Credits Required for Degree: 66

First Semester
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
PLS 101 Introduction to Law for Paralegals (3 credits)
PLS 105 Torts (3 credits)
POL 104 American Government (3 credits)
Humanistic Perspective art or music requirement (3 credits)

Second Semester
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
PLS 102 Legal Research and Writing (3 credits)
PLS 107 Contracts (3 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning mathematics or lab science requirement (4 credits)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (3 credits)

Summer Session
Humanistic Perspective literature requirement (3 credits)
Historical Perspective requirement (3 credits)

Third Semester
ENG 105 Technical Writing (3 credits)
PLS 202 Advanced Legal Research and Writing (3 credits)
PLS 206 Litigation Processes (3 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning mathematics or lab science requirement (4 credits)
Legal elective (3 credits)

Fourth Semester
PLS 204 Business Organization and Government Regulation (3 credits)
PLS 205 Administrative Law (3 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning mathematics or lab science requirement (4 credits)
Legal elective (3 credits)

Note: The Paralegal Studies program prepares students to work under the supervision of an attorney. A paralegal shall not engage in the unauthorized practice of law. Only attorneys can provide legal services directly to the public.


 

NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.

Associate in Science in Accounting

Division of Business – Curriculum Code: 2001

A Dual Admissions Program with Rutgers-Newark, Kean University, and Seton Hall University
Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in Accounting?

The Accounting A.S. degree program is best suited for the student who wishes to pursue, upon completing his/her associate’s degree, a bachelor’s degree in Accounting and also work toward becoming a CPA, CMA and CIA. With advanced degrees/certifications and relevant job experience, students can secure rewarding positions such as accounting manager, internal auditor, financial analyst, tax accountant, or controller in accounting firms, industry, governmental agencies, and non-profit organizations. The A.S. in Accounting degree program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). For more information, please visit http://www.acbsp.org.

Click below to learn more about Essex’s ACBSP-Accredited Program Outcomes.
ACBSP-Accredited Program Outcomes (prepared 2017)

If I major in Accounting, can I transfer to an upper-division college or university?

Yes. The A.S. in Accounting degree prepares you to transfer to upper-division colleges and universities to complete your bachelor’s degree. You may choose to participate in the Dual Admissions Program with Rutgers-Newark, Kean University, and Seton Hall University.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in reading, English, and/or mathematics before taking the core curriculum courses in your major.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you register for an average of 17 credits each semester, you can complete the degree in two years. You may shorten the amount of time required by taking courses in the summer sessions.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Business Division at (973) 877-3222.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the underlying framework of accounting concepts and principles;
  • Apply various accounting skills to prepare financial and/or management accounting summaries and reports, both manually and by using computers;
  • Review and evaluate accounting reporting procedures for compliance with national and international guidelines/standards; and
  • Prepare and discuss Capstone summaries of accounting practices that incorporate several accounting tasks and/or areas.
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (32 - 33 credits)

Written & Oral Communications (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills (7 – 8 credits)
Choose two of the following mathematics courses: MTH 100, MTH 113, MTH 114, MTH 119, MTH 120, or MTH 127 (two 3- or 4-credit courses)

Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (4 credits)
Choose one of the following lab science courses: BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 121, BIO 122; CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 103, CHM 104; PHY 101, PHY 102, PHY 103, PHY 104, PHY 113, or PHY 114 (one 4-credit course)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
Choose two of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; POL 101, POL 104; PSY 101, PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (two 3-credit courses)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
AND
Choose one of the following art or music courses: ART 100, ART 101, ART 102; MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (16 credits)

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I – Financial (4 credits)
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II – Managerial (4 credits)

Choose two 200-level or higher Accounting (ACC) course electives (ACC courses) (two 4-credit courses)

ADDITIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (15 credits)

BUS 101 Business Organization and Management (3 credits)
BUS 251 Business Law I (3 credits)
CIS 107 Computer Literacy, CIS 131 Microcomputers in Business, or CIS 135 Microcomputer Spreadsheets (one 3-credit course)
ECO 101 Principles of Economics (Macro) (3 credits)
ECO 102 Principles of Economics II (Micro) (3 credits)

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

Total Credits Required for Degree: 63 – 64

First Semester
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I – Financial (4 credits)
BUS 101 Business Organization and Management (3 credits)
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills mathematics requirement (one 3- or 4-credit course)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (3 credits)

Second Semester
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II – Managerial (4 credits)
BUS 251 Business Law I (3 credits)
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills mathematics requirement (one 3- or 4-credit course)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (3 credits)

Third Semester
CIS 107 Computer Literacy, CIS 131 Microcomputers in Business, or CIS 135 Microcomputer Spreadsheets (one 3-credit course)
ECO 101 Principles of Economics (Macro) (3 credits)
Accounting elective (4 credits)
Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning lab science requirement (4 credits)

Fourth Semester
ECO 102 Principles of Economics II (Micro) (3 credits)
Accounting elective (4 credits)
Humanistic Perspective literature requirement (3 credits)
Humanistic Perspective art or music requirement (3 credits)
Historical Perspective requirement (3 credits)

NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.

Associate in Science in Music

Division of Humanities & Bilingual Studies — Curriculum Code: 0409

Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in Music?

The Music degree program allows students to complete the equivalent of the first two years of a four-year program in music. Completion of this program is the first step toward gaining a position such as teacher, supervisor, or director of choral, instrumental, and/or theater production programs within middle schools, junior high schools, and senior high schools, as well as in choral and instrumental organizations. Numerous full-time teaching positions exist in public and private schools for music education majors.

If I major in Music, can I transfer to an upper-division college or university?

The Music degree program prepares you to transfer to four-year institutions to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Please not that most no if not all four-year colleges and universities require all music majors and minors to pass an audition before they are accepted into the bachelor’s program.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in reading, English, and/or mathematics before taking the core curriculum courses in your major. It is not required, but prior ability to read music and some performance skills on one instrument or voice is recommended.  Some keyboard skills are also suggested.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you register for an average of 16 credits each semester, you can complete the degree in two years.  You can shorten the amount of time required by taking courses in the summer sessions.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3319/3320.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Demonstrate the development of musical performance skills commensurate to their level of experience;
  • Utilize critical writing skills to critique musical performance;
  • Create and analyze musical compositions to demonstrate mastery of fundamental principles of music theory;
  • Demonstrate an aural application of music theory; and
  • Demonstrate a vocal or keyboard application of music theory.
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills/Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (12 credits)
Choose one math course and a lab science sequence or two mathematics courses and one lab science course from the following:

Math: MTH 100, MTH 101, MTH 103, MTH 113, MTH 119, MTH 120, MTH 121, MTH 122, MTH 127, MTH 221, or MTH 222 (one or two 4-credit courses)
AND
Lab Science: BIO 101 – BIO 102, BIO 103 – BIO 104, BIO 121 – BIO 122; CHM 101 – CHM 102, CHM 103 – CHM 104; PHY 101 – PHY 102, PHY 103 – PHY 104, or PHY 113 – PHY 114 (one or two 4-credit courses)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
Choose two of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; ECO 101, ECO 102; POL 101, POL 104; PSY 101, PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (two 3-credit courses)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
AND
Choose one of the following music courses: MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (26 credits)

MUS 105 Musicianship I (2 credits)
MUS 106 Musicianship II (2 credits)
MUS 115 Ear Training & Sight Singing I (3 credits)
MUS 116 Ear Training & Sight Singing II (3 credits)
MUS 121 Voice Class I or MUS 131 Keyboard Class I (one 2-credit course)
MUS 122 Voice Class II or MUS 132 Keyboard Class II (one 2-credit course)
MUS 141 College Choir I or MUS 153 Instrumental Workshop I (one 1-credit course)
MUS 142 College Choir II or MUS 154 Instrumental Workshop II (one 1-credit course)
MUS 205 Musicianship III (2 credits)
MUS 206 Musicianship IV (2 credits)
MUS 221 Voice Class III or MUS 231 Keyboard Class III (one 2-credit course)
MUS 222 Voice Class IV or MUS 232 Keyboard Class IV (one 2-credit course)
MUS 241 College Choir III or MUS 253 Instrumental Workshop III (one 1-credit course)
MUS 242 College Choir IV or MUS 254 Instrumental Workshop IV (one 1-credit course)

ADDITIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (4 credits)

Choose two to four Music electives* (two to four 1- or 2-credit courses)

Note: It is strongly recommended that students select 4 credits of applied performance courses, i.e., MUS 261 - MUS 269.

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

Total Credits Required for Degree: 63

First Semester
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
MUS 105 Musicianship I (2 credits)
MUS 121 Voice Class I or MUS 131 Keyboard Class I (one 2-credit course)
MUS 141 College Choir I or MUS 153 Instrumental Workshop I (one 1-credit course)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning math or lab science requirement (one 4-credit course)
Humanistic Perspective music requirement (one 3-credit course)
Music elective (one 1- or 2-credit course)

Second Semester
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
MUS 106 Musicianship II (2 credits)
MUS 115 Ear Training and Sight Singing I (3 credits)
MUS 122 Voice Class II or MUS 132 Keyboard Class II (one 2-credit course)
MUS 142 College Choir II or MUS 154 Instrumental Workshop II (one 1-credit course)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning math or lab science requirement (one 4-credit course)
Music elective (one 1- or 2-credit course)

Third Semester
MUS 116 Ear Training & Sight Singing II (3 credits)
MUS 205 Musicianship III (2 credits)
MUS 221 Voice Class III or MUS 231 Keyboard Class III (one 2-credit course)
MUS 241 College Choir III or MUS 253 Instrumental Workshop III (one 1-credit course)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning math or lab science requirement (one 4-credit course)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)

Fourth Semester
MUS 206 Musicianship IV (2 credits)
MUS 222 Voice Class IV or MUS 232 Keyboard Class IV (one 2-credit course)
MUS 242 College Choir IV (1 credit) or MUS 254 Instrumental Workshop IV (one 1-credit course)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)
Humanistic Perspective literature requirement (one 3-credit course)
Historical Perspective requirement (one 3-credit course)
Music elective (one 1- or 2-credit course, if necessary)
Music elective (one 1- or 2-credit course, if necessary)

NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.

 

Associate in Science in General Science

Division of Biology, Chemistry & Physics — Curriculum Code: 0603

Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in General Science?

The General Science degree program provides an opportunity for students interested in health care-related fields as well as those interested in teaching science in grades K – 12 to complete a general science associate’s degree. Students applying to the competitive-entry Nursing & Allied Health programs can complete the pre-requisites for these programs as a General Science major during the first semester. While waiting for acceptance into the professional phase of a program, students can pursue the remaining degree requirements as a General Science major. The curriculum will provide a solid foundation in core courses needed to major in many areas of science and health care. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method and critical analysis that will enable you to be a contributor to any scientific or medical team.

If I major in General Science, can I transfer to an upper division college or university?

The General Science degree program prepares you for transfer to four-year institutions to pursue a bachelor’s degree. ECC’s transfer/articulation agreements with four-year institutions provide smooth transfer for our A.S. graduates.

If I major in General Science, how do I apply to Nursing or Allied Health programs?

See the curriculum guides in this catalog for specific admissions requirements for each competitive-entry program. You may also call the Nursing Department at (973) 877-1868 or the Allied Health Department at (973) 877-3354.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in reading, English, and/or mathematics before taking the core curriculum course in your major. In addition, if you are at the final level of remediation in English or mathematics, you can take BIO 100 and/or CHM 100. While these courses do not count toward graduation in this major, they provide an introduction to the basic biology and chemistry concepts that will prepare you for higher-level courses required in this program.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you take an average of 17 credits each semester, you should be able to complete the program in two years. You can shorten the amount of time required by taking courses in the summer session.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3430.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills, including the scientific method and methods of scientific conversion;
  • Demonstrate mastery of the fundamental concepts of biology, chemistry, and/or physics; and
  • Perform scientific investigations using proper scientific and laboratory safety protocols.
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills and Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (12 credits)
Choose one mathematics course and a lab science sequence or two mathematics courses and one lab science course from the following:

Math – MTH 100, MTH 101, MTH 113, MTH 119, MTH 120, MTH 121, MTH 122, MTH 127, MTH 221, or MTH 222 (one or two 4-credit courses)

Lab Science – BIO 101 – BIO 102, BIO 103 – BIO 104, BIO 121 – BIO 122; CHM 101 – CHM 102, CHM 103 – CHM 104; GEO 101 - GEO 102; PHY 101 – PHY 102, PHY 103 – PHY 104, or PHY 113 – PHY 114 (one or two 4-credit courses)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
Choose two of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; ECO 101, ECO 102; POL 101, POL 104; PSY 101, PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (two 3-credit courses)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
AND
Choose one of the following art or music courses: ART 100, ART 101, ART 102, MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (24 credits)

Science electives - choose six or seven (non-repeated) courses designated BIO, CHM, or PHY (total of 24 credits).

Note: Students should finish course sequences where possible. Also, the same course cannot be used to meet both the Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning lab science general education requirement and the Science elective major course requirement.

In addition, recommended Science electives include the following courses: BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 121, BIO 122, BIO 211, BIO 220, BIO 225, BIO 228, BIO 237, BIO 241, BIO 251; CHM 101, CHM 102, CHM 103, CHM 104, CHM 203, CHM 204; GEO 101, GEO 102; PHY 101, PHY 102, PHY 103, PHY 104, PHY 113, and PHY 114.

ADDITIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (3 credits)

Choose one free elective (one 3-credit course)

Note: The minimum passing grade for all courses designated BIO, CHM, MTH, or PHY is “C.” If you earn a grade below “C,” you need to repeat that course.

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

Total Credits Required for Degree: 60

First Semester
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning math or lab science requirement (one 4-credit course)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning math or lab science requirement (one 4-credit course)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)
Humanistic Perspective art or music requirement (one 3-credit course)

Second Semester
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills or Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning math or lab science requirement (one 4-credit course)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)
Historical Perspective requirement (one 3-credit course)
Science elective (one 3- or 4-credit course)

Third Semester
Humanistic Perspective literature requirement (one 3-credit course)
Science elective (one 3- or 4-credit course)
Science elective (one 3- or 4-credit course)
Science elective (one 3- or 4-credit course)

Fourth Semester
Science elective (one 3- or 4-credit course)
Science elective (one 3- or 4-credit course)
Science elective (one 3- or 4-credit course), if necessary
Free elective (one 3-credit course)

IMPORTANT NOTES

If you plan to apply to the Nursing program, you must take the following pre-requisite courses and have a minimum GPA of 2.5: ENG 101 College Composition I, BIO 121 Anatomy & Physiology I, and CHM 101 College Chemistry I or CHM 103 General Chemistry I and PSY 101 General Psychology I: Personality & Social Aspects successfully completed the TEAS entrance test. (See the Nursing program curriculum guide in this catalog.)

If you plan to apply to the Radiography program, you must take the following four pre-requisite courses and have a minimum GPA of 2.5: ENG 101 College Composition I, BIO 121 Anatomy & Physiology I, HSC 109 Medical Terminology, and MTH 100 Introductory College Mathematics. (See the Radiography program curriculum guide in this catalog.)

If you plan to apply to the Physical Therapist Assistant program, you must take the following three pre-requisite courses and have a minimum GPA of 2.5: ENG 101 College Composition I, BIO 121 Anatomy & Physiology I, and PSY 101 General Psychology I: Personality & Social Aspects and successfully completed the TEAS entrance test. (See the Physical Therapist Assistant Program curriculum guide in this catalog.)

For assistance with Vision Care Technology, Respiratory Care, and Licensed Practical Nurse program requirements, see the various program curriculum guides in this catalog, consult your academic advisor, or call the Vision Care Technology program at (973) 877-3367, the Allied Health Department at (973) 877-3354, or the Nursing Department at (973) 877-1868.

NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.

Associate in Science in Chemistry

Division of Biology, Chemistry & Physics — Curriculum Code: 0602

Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in Chemistry?

Chemistry is essential to areas of study such as biology, chemical engineering, dentistry, forensics, medicine, pharmacology, and polymer science. In addition, chemists are in high demand and often assume to senior leadership positions in corporate America. The curriculum is equivalent to the first two years of a bachelor’s program in Chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method and critical analysis that will enable you to solve chemical problems in various areas of scientific endeavor.

If I major in Chemistry, can I transfer to an upper division college or university?

The Chemistry degree program prepares you for transfer to four-year institutions to pursue a bachelor’s degree. ECC’s transfer/articulation agreements with four-year institutions provide smooth transfer for our A.S. graduates.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in reading, English, and/or mathematics before taking the core curriculum courses in your major. In addition, if you are at the final level of remediation of English and mathematics, you may take CHM 100. While this course does not count toward graduation in this major, it will provide an introduction to the basic chemical principles and theories that will prepare you for higher-level courses required in higher-level courses in this program.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you take an average of 17 credits each semester, you should be able to complete the program in two years.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3430.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills, including the scientific method and methods of scientific conversion;
  • Demonstrate mastery of the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry, including the chemical laws of nature, solutions, acids and bases, kinetics, equilibrium, and thermochemistry;
  • Demonstrate mastery of the fundamental concepts of organic chemistry, including functional groups, reactions, syntheses, and mechanisms; and
  • Perform chemical experiments in a safe and scientific manner, using proper scientific and laboratory safety procedures.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills (8 credits)
MTH 121 (4 credits)
MTH 122 (4 credits)

Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (4 credits)
PHY 101 (4 credits)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
Choose two of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; ECO 101, ECO 102; POL 101, POL 104; PSY 101, PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (two 3-credit courses)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
AND
Choose one of the following art or music courses: ART 100, ART 101, ART 102, MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (27 credits)

CHM 103 General Chemistry I (4 credits)
CHM 104 General Chemistry II (4 credits)
CHM 203 Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
CHM 204 Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
CHM 299 Independent Research Study in Chemistry (3 credits)
MTH 221 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (4 credits)
PHY 102 College Physics II (4 credits)
CHM 299 Independent Research Study in Chemistry

Notes:
(1)The minimum passing grade for all courses designated BIO, CHM, MTH or PHY is “C.” If you earn a grade below “C,” you need to repeat that course.
(2)*Students who would like to transfer to Rutgers – Newark for their Bachelor’s degree should take PHY 103 and PHY 104 instead of PHY 101 and PHY 102.

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

Total Credits Required for Degree: 60

First Semester
CHM 103 General Chemistry I (4 credits)
PHY 101* College Physics I (4 credits)
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
MTH 121 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4 credits)
Historical Perspective requirement (one 3-credit course)

Second Semester
CHM 104 General Chemistry II (4 credits)
PHY 102* College Physics II (4 credits)
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
MTH 122 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (4 credits)

Third Semester
CHM 203 Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
MTH 221 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (4 credits)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)
Humanistic Perspective literature requirement (one 3-credit course)

Fourth Semester
CHM 204 Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
CHM 299 Independent Research Study in Chemistry (3 credits)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)
Humanistic Perspective art or music requirement (one 3-credit course)
Free elective (one 3-credit course)


 

NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice

Division of Social Sciences — Curriculum Code: 0898

Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in Criminal Justice?

The program is designed to prepare each student to transfer upon graduation to a four-year institution to pursue a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice or a related field or to enter the job market directly. The program offers students preparation to enter and/or progress in the fields of professional law enforcement, pre-law, corrections, probation, parole, corporate security, juvenile youth services, homeland security, criminology, social sciences research, careers in the courts, forensic science, criminal justice policy/reform, and sky marshal.

If I major in Criminal Justice, can I transfer to an upper-division college or university?

Yes. Essex County College, through the NJ Transfer Program, has entered into transfer/articulation agreements with all of the following four-year colleges and universities: Rutgers University, New Jersey City University, Kean University, William Paterson University, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. These institutions admit as juniors students who complete their A.S. degree. This means you can complete your freshman and sophomore years at affordable Essex County College, and then transfer and graduate with the same bachelor’s degree, which is awarded to students who started at the four-year institution, for a fraction of the cost. There is also an articulation agreement with Thomas Edison State College, which offers an alternate route to a bachelor’s degree. This program features blended courses, online classes, and continued study at ECC for satisfaction of the four-year degree requirement. Consult with a Social Sciences academic advisor (faculty member) or the ECC Transfer Coordinator to review specific requirements for gaining junior status upon transfer.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement tests scores, you may be required to take developmental courses in reading, English, and/or mathematics before taking the core curriculum courses in your major.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you register for an average of 17 credits each semester, you can complete the degree in two years.  You may shorten the time required by taking courses during the winter intersession and/or summer sessions.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3250 or the Program Coordinator at (973) 877-3052.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Describe the functions of the various components of  the criminal and juvenile justice system (i.e., law enforcement, courts, and corrections) and explain the interrelationship of these components;
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of criminal law and the rights of individual citizens;
  • Describe the role and ethical responsibilities of the criminal justice professional in the community and the organization and administration of the various entities in the criminal justice system;
  • Analyze the nature of crime and criminal behavior (e.g., theories, policies, and research);
  • Explain the social, political, economic, and cultural factors within society that influence the development of criminological theory, corrections, laws, and criminal justice practices and their application to criminal behaviors and sanctions;
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills within the context of evaluating the complexity of criminal justice issues; and
  • Communicate effectively with accurate ‘criminal justice’ terminology in written and/or oral form with a demonstrated proficiency in the use of technology.

Notice: This Criminal Justice program curriculum is new and applies to students who entered this major during or after Summer II 2016. If you were continuously enrolled in this major before Summer II 2016, then this is the wrong curriculum. Please consult the “CATALOG ARCHIVES” section for your correct catalog.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills (4 credits)
Choose one of the following mathematics courses: MTH 100, MTH 101, MTH 103, MTH 113, MTH 119, MTH 120, MTH 121, MTH 122, MTH 127, MTH 221, or MTH 222 (one 4-credit course)

Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (8 credits)
Choose one of the following biology course sequences: BIO 101 – BIO 102, BIO 103 – BIO 104, or BIO 121 – BIO 122 (two 4-credit courses total)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
POL 104 (3 credits)
AND
Choose one of the following courses: ANT 101, PSY 101, or SOC 101 (one 3-credit course)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
AND
Choose one of the following art or music courses: ART 100, ART 101, ART 102; MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (21 credits)

CJI 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CJI 121 Introduction to Corrections (3 credits)
CJI 136 Criminology (3 credits)
CJI 202 Crime and Delinquency (3 credits)
CJI 205 Criminal Law (3 credits)
Choose any two of the following Criminal Justice (CJI) course electives: CJI 102 Police Role in the Community, CJI 103 Probation and Parole, CJI 111 Police Administration and Organization, CJI 112 Police Management, CJI 120 Prison Subcultures and Lifestyles, CJI 123 Correctional Administration, CJI 203 Principles of Criminal Investigation, CJI 204 Evidence, CJI 210 Forensic Science, and/or CJI 250 Current Issues in Criminal Justice (two 3-credit courses)

ADDITIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (12 credits)

Choose one language course: SPN 101 or FRN 101* (one 3-credit course)

Literature elective – choose anyadditional (non-repeated) 200-level ENG course (one 3-credit course)

History elective – choose the HST course needed to complete the general education requirement history course sequence (one 3-credit course)

Choose any free elective (one 3-credit course)

*Note: See program advisor for other language options such as Arabic.
**Note: Students are strongly encouraged to complete their language sequence by taking SPN 102 Elementary Spanish II or FRN 102 Elementary French II (one 3-credit course). Otherwise, it is recommended that students choose one 3-credit courses offered in the following discipline: Psychology (PSY), Education (EDU), Sociology (SOC), Criminal Justice (CJI), Political Science (SOL), Health (HLT), Religion (REL) or three 1-credit Physical Education (PHE) courses. While it is recommended that students choose from the disciplines above, students are free to choose classes from other areas of the College to fulfill this free elective.

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

First Semester
CJI 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
Historical Perspective requirement (3 credits)
SPN 101 Elementary Spanish I OR FRN 101 Elementary French I (3 credits)

Second Semester
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
Criminal Justice elective (3 credits)
Free elective (SPN 102 Elementary Spanish II or FRN 102 Elementary French II strongly recommended) (one 3-credit course)
Quantitative Knowledge & Skills mathematics requirement
Society & Human Behavior requirement (3 credits)

Summer Session
History elective requirement (3 credits)
Humanistic Perspective art or music requirement (3 credits)

Third Semester
CJI 136 Criminology (3 credits)
Criminal Justice elective (3 credits)
Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning biology course requirement (to complete the Biology course sequence) (4 credits)
Literature elective (3 credits)
POL 104 American Government (3 credits)

Fourth Semester
CJI 202 Crime and Delinquency (3 credits)
CJI 205 Criminal Law (3 credits)
Criminal Justice elective (3 credits)
Humanistic Perspective literature elective (3 credits)
Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning biology course requirement (4 credits)


 
NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.
 
Criminal Justice Inquiry

Associate in Science in Mathematics

Division of Mathematics, Engineering Technologies & Computer Science — Curriculum Code: 0604

A Dual Admissions Program with Rutgers-Newark, Kean University, and New Jersey City University
Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in Mathematics?

Mathematics encompasses logic and methodology of reasoning and provides the tools for critical thinking and decision-making. The program emphasizes methodical problem-solving techniques and is designed for students who intend to pursue a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, applied mathematics, mathematics education, or a related field. Students will acquire fundamental knowledge in proof and theory, applications, and algorithms. Developing an appreciation for and proficiency in using graphic utilities and other technological devices prepares you for success in mathematically-rich courses.

If I major in Mathematics, can I transfer to an upper-division college or university?

Yes. You may choose to participate in the Dual Admissions program with Rutgers University-Newark, Kean University, or New Jersey City University. Essex County College’s transfer/articulation agreements with other area four-year colleges and universities provide a smooth transfer for A.S. graduates.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in reading, English, and/or mathematics before taking the core curriculum courses in your major. Students are strongly encouraged to take pre-calculus in their senior year of high school or during the summer before beginning the Mathematics Program at ECC. A solid foundation in all aspects of precalculus mathematics is essential for success in high-level mathematics courses. In addition, knowledge of college algebra, trigonometry, and geometry fundamentals is necessary.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you register for an average of 16 credits each semester, you can complete the degree in two years.  You may shorten the time required by taking courses in the summer sessions.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3302/3303.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental concepts of theories from calculus, differential equations, linear algebra, and discrete mathematics;
  • Utilize various problem-solving and critical thinking techniques to set up and solve applied problems in engineering, sciences, business, and technology fields;
  • Communicate accurate mathematical terminology and notation in written and/or oral form in order to explain strategies to solve problems as well as to interpret found solutions; and
  • Use appropriate technology, such as graphing calculators and computer software effectively,  as a tool to solve such problems as those described above.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills (4 credits)
MTH 121 (4 credits)

Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (8 credits)
PHY 103 (4 credits)
PHY 104 (4 credits)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
ECO 101 (3 credits)
AND
Choose one of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; ECO 102; POL 101, POL 104; PSY 101, PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (one 3-credit course)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
And
Choose one of the following art or music courses: ART 100, ART 101, ART 102; MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (19 - 22 credits)

MTH 136* Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
MTH 222 Differential Equations (4 credits)
MTH 239 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3 credits)
Choose three Major electives depending on the branch of mathematics you wish to pursue** (three 3- and/or 4-credit courses)

*Note: Honors students or students who wish to purse mathematics education may subsitute a research-based course, such as Rutgers’ STS:307 Education Research and Evaluation (3 credits) or a similar Capstone research course for MTH 136, if approved by a Mathematics Department academic advisor (faculty member).

**Note: Required Major elective courses, based on which branch of mathematics a student wishes to pursue, are as follows:

Pure or Applied Mathematics branch - Choose CSC 122 Computer Science II (4 credits), a Computer Science elective – any 200-level CSC course (one 4-credit course), and any foreign language course designated ARB, FRN, ITL, or SPN (one 3-credit course).

Mathematics Primary Education branch – Choose three of the following courses: EDU 101 Introduction to Education (3 credits), EDU 103 Philosophy & History of Education (3 credits), EDU 201 Education in Urban Environment (3 credits), and/or CSC 122 Computer Science II (4 credits).

Mathematics Secondary Education branch – Choose three of the following Rutgers-Newark courses: Rutgers 300:292 Social Foundations of Urban Education (3 credits), Rutgers 300:295 Adolescent Psychology & the Urban Experience (3 credits), Rutgers 300:298 21st Century Urban Educator (3 credits), and/or Rutgers 640:314 Foundations of Modern Math (3 credits).

ADDITIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (12 credits)

CSC 121 Computer Science I (4 credits)
MTH 122 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (4 credits)
MTH 221 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (4 credits)

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

Total Credits Required for Degree: 64 – 67

Note: The program pre-requisite courses (MTH 100 Introductory College Mathematics, MTH 119 Pre-Calculus I, and MTH 120 Pre-Calculus II) should be completed before your first semester at ECC (i.e., during your senior year in high school or during summer sessions or through placement exams). Mathematics placement tests are available for all pre-requisite courses (see http://placement.mathography.org for further information). If you are still in high school, the pre-requisite courses may be completed through the High School Initiative Program free of charge if your school participates. Also, PHY 101 College Physics I and PHY 102 College Physics II are strongly recommended as program pre-requisites if you did not take physics in high school at all.

First Semester
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
MTH 121 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4 credits)
PHY 103 General Physics I (4 credits)
CSC 121 Computer Science I (4 credits)

Second Semester
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
MTH 122 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (4 credits)
PHY 104 General Physics II (4 credits)
Major elective course (one 3- or 4-credit course)

Summer Session
Historical Perspective requirement (3 credits)

Third Semester
MTH 136 Discrete Mathematics or other approved research-based course (3 credits)
MTH 221 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (4 credits)

Humanistic Perspective art or music requirement (one 3-credit course)
Humanistic Perspective literature requirement (one 3-credit course)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)

Fourth Semester
MTH 222 Differential Equations (4 credits)
MTH 239 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3 credits)
ECO 101 Principles of Economics (Macro) (3 credits)
Major elective (one 3- or 4-credit course)
Major elective (one 3- or 4-credit course)


 

NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.

Associate in Science in Biology/Pre-Medicine

Division of Biology, Chemistry & Physics — Curriculum Code: 0601

Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree
Why major in Biology/Pre-Medicine?

Biology is the primary life science from which students can enter specific fields of study as diverse as molecular biology, forestry, pathophysiology, neuroanatomy, and parasitology. Biology also provides the foundation for students who wish to become physicians, dentists, or other medical professionals. The curriculum is equivalent to the first two years of a bachelor’s program in Biology. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method and critical analysis that will enable you to be a contributor to any scientific or medical team.

If I major in Biology/Pre-Medicine, can I transfer to an upper division college or university?

The Biology/Pre-Medicine degree program prepares you for transfer to four-year institutions to pursue a bachelor’s degree. ECC’s transfer/articulation agreements with four-year institutions provide smooth transfer for our A.S. graduates.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in reading, English and/or mathematics before you begin taking the core curriculum courses in your major. In addition, if you are at the final level of remediation of English and mathematics, you may take either BIO 100 or CHM 100. While neither count toward graduation in this major, these courses will provide an introduction to basic biology and chemistry concepts that will prepare you for higher-level courses required in this program.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental coursework and you register for an average of 15 credits each semester, you can complete the program in two years.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3430.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills, including the scientific method and methods of scientific conversion;
  • Demonstrate mastery of the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry;
  • Demonstrate mastery of the fundamental concepts of biology at the genetic, molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal level; and
  • Conduct scientific investigations using proper scientific and laboratory protocols.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (33 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)
ENG 101 (3 credits)
ENG 102 (3 credits)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills (4 credits)
MTH 119 (4 credits)

Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (8 credits)
BIO 103 (4 credits)
BIO 104 (4 credits)

Society & Human Behavior (6 credits)
Choose two of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; ECO 101, ECO 102; POL 101, POL 104; PSY 101, PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (two 3-credit courses)

Humanistic Perspective (6 credits)
Choose one of the following literature courses: ENG 205, ENG 208, ENG 215, ENG 221, ENG 222, ENG 232, ENG 237, ENG 238, ENG 242, ENG 250, ENG 263, or ENG 264 (one 3-credit course)
AND
Choose one of the following art or music courses: ART 100, ART 101, ART 102, MUS 100, MUS 108, MUS 109, or MUS 117 (one 3-credit course)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)
Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS (28 Credits)

CHM 103 General Chemistry I (4 credits)
CHM 104 General Chemistry II (4 credits)
MTH 120 Pre-Calculus II (4 credits)
PHY 101 College Physics I and PHY 102 College Physics II (two 4-credit courses) or CHM 203 Organic Chemistry I and CHM 204 Organic Chemistry II (two 4-credit courses)

Choose two of the following Biology electives*: BIO 211 Microbiology, BIO 220 Environmental Science, BIO 228 Molecular Biology, and/or BIO 237 Genetics (two 4-credit courses)

Notes:
(1)*The sequence BIO 121 – BIO 122 (a total of 8 credits) may be substituted for one 4-credit Biology elective.
(2)The minimum passing grade for all courses designated BIO, CHM, MTH or PHY is “C.” If you earn a grade below “C,” you need to repeat that course.

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES

Total Credits Required for Degree: 61

First Semester
BIO 103 General Biology I (4 credits)
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
CHM 103 General Chemistry I (4 credits)
MTH 119 Pre-Calculus I (4 credits)

Second Semester
BIO 104 General Biology II (4 credits)
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
CHM 104 General Chemistry II (4 credits)
MTH 120 Pre-Calculus II (4 credits)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)

Third Semester
PHY 101 College Physics I or CHM 203 Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
Biology elective (one 4-credit course)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (one 3-credit course)
Humanistic Perspective literature requirement (one 3-credit course)

Fourth Semester
PHY 102 College Physics II or CHM 204 Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
Biology elective (one 4-credit course)
Humanistic Perspective art or music requirement (one 3-credit course)
Historical Perspective requirement (one 3-credit course)


 

NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, English, and mathematics as well as other pre-requisites and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.