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ENG 221 American Literature I

ENG 221 – Survey of American Literature I

Course Outline

Course Number and Name:   ENG 221 Survey of American Literature I

Credit hours:  3.0             Contact Hours:  3.0         Lecture: 3.0        Lab: N/A              Other: N/A

Prerequisites:   Grade of “C” or better in ENG 102 or ENG 105

Co-requisites:  None                                                      Concurrent Courses:  None

Course Description: This course focuses on writing in the United States from its beginnings in Native American oral literature to the antebellum era. The construction of America will be examined through intensive study of various texts, both poetry and prose.

General Education Goals: ENG 221 is affirmed in the following General Education Foundation Category:  Humanistic Perspective.  The corresponding General Education Goal is as follows:  Students will analyze works in the field of art, music, or theater; literature; and philosophy and/or religious studies; and will gain competence in the use of a foreign language.  ENG 221 also addresses the General Education Integrated Course Goal: Information Literacy, which is as follows: Students will address an information need by locating, evaluating, and effectively using information.

Course Goals: Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to do the following:

  1. read and analyze a variety of New World texts, from the oral literature of the native inhabitants and the written texts of the first European and English immigrants to the emergence of a truly American literature in the 18th and 19th centuries, ending with a major work of the antebellum era;
  2. efficiently use the library as a research facility and the internet as a research tool;
  3. demonstrate refined composition skills through the writing of critical analysis essays on a variety of American texts, including poems, political tracts, slave narratives, short stories, and novels; and
  4. write a fully documented, MLA-compliant literary research paper on a major work analyzed in class.