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HST 112 AMERICAN HISTORY II

HST 112 American History II

Course Outline

Course Number & Name:  HST 112 American History II

Credit Hours:  3.0             Contact Hours:  3.0          Lecture:  3.0       Lab:  N/A             Other:  N/A

Prerequisites:  Grades of “C” or better in ENG 096 and RDG 096 or placement; it is recommended that HST 111 be taken before HST 112

Co-requisites:  None                                                      Concurrent Courses:  None

Course Description: This course surveys the history of theUnited   States from 1877 to the present.  It examines the political, economic, intellectual, and social forces that shaped modernAmerica.  Particular attention is given to developments surrounding the industrialization of theUnited States, the emergence of theUnited States as a world power, immigration, economic changes in the twentieth century including periods of prosperity and depression, and the civil rights and women’s rights movements.

General Education Goals: HST 112 is affirmed in the following General Education Foundation Category: Historical Perspective.  The corresponding General Education Goal is as follows: Students will understand historical events and movements in World, Western, non-Western, or American societies and assess their subsequent significance.  HST 112 also addresses the General Education Integrated Course Goal: Information Literacy, which is as follows: Students will address an information need by locating, evaluating, and effectively using information.

Course Goals: Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to do the following:

  1. demonstrate knowledge of some of the fundamental concepts and theories of historical events, institutions, and ideas related to the industrialization of the United States, the emergence of the United States as a world power, immigration, economic changes in the twentieth century including periods of prosperity and depression, and the civil rights and women’s movements;
  2. evaluate key American ideas and institutions in relation to global history, including perspectives in the context of social, political, religious and intellectual traditions; and
  3. read, analyze, organize, and synthesize evidence, historical problems, and interpretations connected to American history.