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Associate in Applied Science in Human and Social Services

Division of Social Sciences — Curriculum Code: 2202

Will Earn Upon Program Completion: Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree

 

Why major in Human and Social Services?
  • To obtain a broad-based education in preparation for a wide variety of jobs such as the following: clergy counselor, social services case aide, addiction counselor, youth services worker, gerontology worker, family services worker, crisis counselor, and mental health worker; and
  • To begin a career where you have the satisfaction of helping individuals and communities.
What options are offered in this program?

Human and Social Services A.A.S. degree program options include addiction counselor, clergy counselor, mental health, and social work/gerontology.

Do I have to choose a concentration option?

No, you do not have to choose a concentration option. Instead you may choose to have a general concentration.

If I major in Human and Social Services, can I transfer to an upper-division college or university?

This program is designed for immediate employment. However, four-year institutions will apply most or all of your courses toward a bachelor’s degree depending upon their program requirements. Consult your departmental academic advisor to obtain information about transferability. Students pursuing the Clergy Counselor option are, upon graduation, accepted into the Religious Studies online BA degree program at Hampton University.

Are there any requirements I must satisfy before I start taking courses in my major?

Based on your placement test scores, you may have to take developmental courses in mathematics, English and/or reading before taking the core curriculum courses in your major.

How long will it take for me to complete this degree?

If you do not need developmental course work and you register for an average of 17 credits each semester, you can complete the degree in two years.  You may shorten the amount of time by taking courses in the summer sessions.

Where should I direct specific questions about this program?

Call the Division at (973) 877-3250.

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the structure, policies, procedures, purposes, and offerings of the agencies and institutions that provide human and social services to individuals, families, groups, and communities;
  • Describe, explain, and analyze the scope, importance, and components of ethical and professional standards and the moral values that guide professional practice and service providers;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of theoretical approaches of various levels of practice in social work, gerontology, addictions counseling, mental health, and treatment;
  • Discuss, examine, and demonstrate clinical skills (including but not limited to case conceptualization, hypothesis building, and therapeutic techniques) and effective communication skills used to engage diverse client populations in the helping process in order to facilitate positive behavioral changes; and
  • Explain the psychological impact of diverse religious and cultural beliefs upon the helping relationship.

 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:

(22 credits)

Written & Oral Communication (6 credits)

ENG 101 and ENG 102 (two 3-credit courses)

Quantitative Knowledge & Skills/Scientific Knowledge & Reasoning (4 credits)

Choose one of the following math or lab science courses: MTH 101, MTH 103; BIO 101, BIO 102, BIO 121, or BIO 122 (BIO 102 or MTH 101 are recommended) (one 4-credit course)

Society & Human Behavior (9 credits)

PSY 101 (3 credits)

Choose two of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 105; ECO 101, ECO 102; POL 101, POL 104;  PSY 102, PSY 219; SOC 101, SOC 108, or SOC 219 (two 3-credit courses)

Historical Perspective (3 credits)

Choose one of the following history courses: HST 101, HST 102, HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122, HST 131, HST 132, HST 134, HST 135, HST 136, HST 137, HST 161, or HST 162 (one 3-credit course)

 

MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

(33 credits)

PSY 209 Abnormal Psychology or PSY 225 Child and Adolescent Abnormal Psychology (one 3-credit course)
PSY 250 Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3 credits)
PSY 251 Counseling and Treatment of Addictions (3 credits)
SOC 111 Helper Theory (3 credits)
SOC 121 Social Services Policies and Procedures (3 credits)
SOC 207 Understanding Death and Dying (3 credits)
SOC 228 Human and Social Services Fieldwork I (3 credits)
SOC 229 Human and Social Services Internship Seminar I (3 credits)
SOC 230 Human and Social Services Fieldwork II (3 credits)
SOC 231 Human and Social Services Internship Seminar II (3 credits)
SOC 250 Alcohol and Drug Use in American Society (3 credits)

 

ADDITIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

(12 credits)

Choose one free elective (CIS 107 Computer Literacy, HLT 101 Healthful Living, MTH 101 Statistics and Probability I, or SPN 100 Practical Spanish are recommended) (one 3-credit course)

Social Science electives* – choose three of the following courses based on chosen concentration option (see *Note): CJI 211 Counseling the Addicted Offender; PSY 210 Group Dynamics, PSY 219 Child Psychology and Development, PSY 232 Human Sexuality; REL 101 Hebrew and Christian Thought, REL 105 Comparative Religion; SOC 108 Social Problems, SOC 153 Alcohol and Substance Abuse Prevention and Education, SOC 201 Social Gerontology, and/or SOC 252 Case Management of Addictions (three 3-credit courses)

*Note: In acknowledging the distinctive and specialized education and training that social workers, addiction counselors, clergy counselors, and psychologists obtain to provide a broad array of mental health and rehabilitative services, the Human and Social Services program has established several concentration options. The choice of Social Science electives depends on the chosen option. Students in the social work/gerontology option should choose SOC 108, SOC 201, and any other course listed. Students in the addictions counseling option should choose CJI 211, SOC 153, and SOC 252. Students in the mental health option should select PSY 210, PSY 219, and PSY 232. Students in the clergy counselor option should select REL 101, REL 105, and any other course listed.Additional Note: Educational requirements for Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor in New Jersey are met by CJI 211, PSY 251, SOC 153, SOC 250, SOC 252, SOC 228/229, and SOC 230/231.

Total Credits Required for Degree: 67

 

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES:

 

First Semester
ENG 101 College Composition I (3 credits)
PSY 101 General Psychology (3 credits)
SOC 111 Helper Theory (3 credits)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (3 credits)
Free elective (3 credits)

Second Semester
ENG 102 College Composition II (3 credits)
PSY 209 Abnormal Psychology OR PSY 225 Child and Adolescent Psychology (3 credits)
SOC 121 Social Services Policies and Procedures (3 credits)
Math/Lab Science requirement (4 credits)
History requirement (3 credits)

Third Semester
SOC 207 Understanding Death and Dying (3 credits)
SOC 228 Human and Social Services Fieldwork I (3 credits)
SOC 229 Human and Social Services Internship Seminar I (3 credits)
(Note: SOC 228 and SOC 229 must be taken together)
Society & Human Behavior requirement (3 credits)
Social Science elective (3 credits)

Fourth Semester
PSY 251 Counseling and Treatment of Addictions (3 credits)
SOC 230 Human and Social Services Fieldwork II (3 credits)
SOC 231 Human and Social Services Internship Seminar II (3 credits)
(Note: SOC 230 and SOC 231 must be taken together)
SOC 250 Alcohol and Drug Use in American Society (3 credits)
Social Science elective (3 credits)
Social Science elective (3 credits)

 

NOTES:
(1) The two General Education Integrated Course Goals, Ethical Reasoning & Action and Information Literacy, are both addressed by the required curriculum described above, regardless of specific choices made by the individual student.
(2) This plan assumes the completion of all required developmental courses in reading, writing, and mathematics as well as other pre- and co-requisites for some of the courses, as listed in the Course Descriptions section.