Essex County College was featured in the September 22 edition of the Caldwell Progress newspaper.  The profile has information about our upcoming $6.6 million West Essex campus expansion project and our exhibit at the Rotary/Kiwanis Caldwell Street Fair on October 5, which can be read by clicking here

Posted in Essex County College News, West Essex Campus

Some of the supplies donated for the Ebola virus relief effort in Liberia, as coordinated by the Center for African Studies at Rutgers University. From left: Essex President’s Office Assistant Jasmine Perez; Program Coordinator for the Rutgers Center for Global Advancement & International Affairs Kim Pernice; Assistant to the Director of the Center for African Studies at Rutgers Rene DeLancey, and Essex Coordinator to the President & Trustees Rasheedah Billups.

Essex County College and Rutgers University recently provided badly needed supplies to help combat the ongoing outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in Liberia. Under the Council of Higher Education in Newark (CHEN), a collaborative partnership between New Jersey Institute of Technology, Rutgers University at Newark, and Essex under the Newark City of Learning Collaborative (NCLC) umbrella, the organizations joined forces for this initiative.

 

Essex President Dr. Gale E. Gibson was able to present to Renee DeLancey, representing Director Ousseina Alidou at Rutgers’s Center for African Studies in Piscataway, a number of needed items, including:

 

  • 10,000 pairs of gloves
  • 600 heavy duty garbage bags
  • 80 bars of disinfectant soap
  • 35 containers of Lysol disinfectant wipes
  • 16 bottles of liquid disinfectant soap

 

Dr.  Dean Marcia Brown, who is also special assistant to Rutgers’s Chancellor Nancy Cantor, assisted in connecting the African Studies Center with Essex County College. The overall effort is through the Center’s Rutgers Emergency Medical Assistance to Fight Ebola in West Africa – Starting in Liberia.

 

“Our donation to this worthwhile endeavor is the right thing to do,” said Dr. Gibson. She noted that one of the College’s recently adopted Strategic Goals is Collaborative Partnerships with the Community, something in which this humanitarian donation fits.

 

Rutgers University Distinguished Professor Jim Simon, of the School of Environmental and Biological Studies and part of the medical assistance team, was impressed by the generous donation and the collaboration between the two colleges.

 

Essex County College, with students from some 50 nations, has been establishing recently academic relationships with a number of countries including Sierra Leone, also hit hard by the Ebola virus.

 

Rutgers University at Newark has a long historical connection to Liberia, including working closely with the University of Liberia and Cuttington University. The outbreak had prompted RU@N to establish the Emergency Action Committee to assist its partnering Liberian institutions to combat this growing threat to the people of Liberia.

 

 

Photo above, from left: Essex President’s Office Assistant Jasmine Perez; Program Coordinator for the Rutgers Center for Global Advancement & International Affairs Kim Pernice; Assistant to the Director of the Center for African Studies at Rutgers Rene DeLancey, and Essex Coordinator to the President & Trustees Rasheedah Billups.

 

Posted in Essex County College News

Essex County College History Instructor Mikal Naeem Nash has been teaching on the history of Islam for years within his African-American history classes. Now the subject is fully packaged into a single course and will be part of the College’s Associate degree offering – Africana Studies.

 

Islam and the Global Black Experience (History 205) is a three credit course that will be taught Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. this fall. Information on the class is available by calling Instructor Nash, Division of Humanities, at 973.877.3489.

 

“The emphasis of the course is on the history of Islam, and how it spread from Arabia to Africa and the Americas,” Nash said. He noted Islam has been around for many centuries, but believes it’s not truly understood by many people today.  “We will also look at the culture and the issues of family as it relates to the religion.”

 

According to the course description, the class will examine such issues facing the American Muslim as gender disputes, ethnic diversity, race, interfaith and intra-faith dialogues, the influence of the Hip Hop culture, the criminal justice system, citizenship, recovery from slavery, social activism and class struggle.

 

Dean of Liberal Arts S. Aisha Steplight Johnson said, “It’s a course that will expose our students to a different perspective about religion and help them understand it in a modern context.”

 

Instructor Nash is also the author of Islam among Urban Blacks, which examines the evolution of the Muslim community in Newark.

Posted in Academic, Essex County College News